NIGERIAN TEACHERS, FOREIGN PUBLISHERS AND THE PRODUCTION OF SCHOOL BOOKS IN SOUTH-WESTERN NIGERIA OF THE 1950s

Authors

  • Mutiat Titilope Oladejo University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Keywords:

Nigerian teachers, foreign publishers, colonial state, school administration

Abstract

The colonial state paid attention to school administration in Nigeria in various ways. In the early 1950s, school resources were significant for foreign publishers and producers of learning materials. Several primary and secondary schools had been in existence and owned by missionaries, communities and individuals. The colonial state introduced new initiatives to centralize and consolidate an African school culture within the context of the international capitalist system. Hence, the interests of foreign publishers influenced school book supply and subjects taught in schools. This work analyses these nuances. Specifically, Nigerian teachers evolved textbook writing culture to take advantage of the internal self-rule era in the Nigerian polity but they were entangled in the politics of book publishing. However, the Nigerian teachers were challenged by the market forces and monopoly of foreign publishers, reinforced by the capitalists’ notions of the colonial state. The work adopts the historical method. Mainly, correspondence letters from files of the Ibadan Ministry of Education (IbMinEd), at the National Archives, Ibadan were utilized.

Author Biography

Mutiat Titilope Oladejo, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Mutiat Titilope Oladejo is of the Department of History, University of Ibadan

Downloads

Published

2023-12-22

How to Cite

Oladejo, M. T. (2023). NIGERIAN TEACHERS, FOREIGN PUBLISHERS AND THE PRODUCTION OF SCHOOL BOOKS IN SOUTH-WESTERN NIGERIA OF THE 1950s. Arts and Social Science Research, 13(4), 177–198. Retrieved from https://fassjassr.com.ng/index.php/assr/article/view/140